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GETTING READY FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR

Australian School Term Dates for 2022

With the start of the school year not far away and with teachers starting to think about planning out the year that lies ahead, we thought it would be helpful if we shared all the 2022 school term dates with you so to assist with planning your schedules.

Below is a list of all the term dates for each state in Australia, listed in alphabetical order (along with a little fun information about each capital city to help with your general trivia knowledge!)

We hope that all of you have a very productive and happy new school year and please remember that Pro AV Solutions and the PAVE Academy are here to help you in any way we can. Please keep checking back to read our blog (new posts regularly), engage in our free webinar series, engage with our On-Demand Micro PD Courses or for those who have purchased your Education Technology through Pro AV Solutions, reach out to engage in our free Professional Learning and Coaching sessions. 

And remember, if you are looking for any Education Technology solutions please do not hesitate to contact us and see if we can be of assistance.

ACT

  • T1: Tuesday 1st February to Friday 8th April
  • T2: Tuesday 26th April to Friday 1st July
  • T3: Monday 18th July to Friday 23rd September
  • T4: Monday 10th October to Friday 16th December

Source here 

Canberra, the capital city of ACT and Australia is claimed to derive from the work “Kambera” or “Canberry” which is said to mean meeting place in Ngunnawal which is one of the indigenous languages of the district. However this meaning has been disputed  with claims that “Canberra” and “Nganbra” are the indigenous names for the two mountains, Black Mountain and Mount Ainslie surrounding the city. 

NSW

  • T1 (Eastern Division): Friday 28th January to Friday 8th April
  • T1 Western Division): Friday 4th February to Friday 8th April
  • T2: Tuesday 26th April to Friday 1st July
  • T3: Monday 18th July to Friday 23rd September
  • T4: Monday 10th October to Tuesday 20th December

Originally named “New Albion” by British settlers, Sydney later adopted its name after the then British Home Secretary Thomas Townshend, Lord Sydney. It is suggested that this was the result of the charter authorizing Governor Phillip to establish a colony on the site and was so done on the 7th of February 1788.

NT

  • T1: (Urban Schools) Monday 31st January to Friday 8th April
  • T1 (Remote Schools): Tuesday 1st February to Friday 8th April
  • T2: Tuesday 19th April to Friday 24th June
  • T3: Tuesday 19th July to Friday 23rd September
  • T4: (Urban Schools) Monday 10th October to Thursday 15th December
  • T4 (Remote Schools): Monday 10th October to Friday 16th December

On the 5th of February 1869 a small settlement of 135 men and women was established at the Port of Darwin. The Port of Darwin, discovered by Captain J.C. Wickham, named it after Charles Darwin who had once sailed the HMS Beagle. Apparently, due to the controversy of some of Charles Darwin’s theories, the settlement was renamed Palmerston in 1869 after British Prime Minister Lord Palmerston, but it reverted back to Darwin in 1911.

QLD

  • T1: Monday 24th January to Friday 1st April
  • T2: Tuesday 19th April to Friday 24th June
  • T3: Monday 11th July to Friday 16th September
  • T4: Tuesday 4th October to Friday 9th December

Conceived initially as a penal colony for British Convicts sent from Sydney, Brisbane was settled as a town in 1834, became a free settlement in 1838, a municipality in 1859, and was considered a metropolitan area in 1924. Named to honour Sir Thomas Brisbane, the Governor of New South Wales from 1821 to 1825, the name was officially adopted in 1834, to replace its “penal colony” status

SA

  • T1: Monday 31st January to Thursday 14th April
  • T2: Monday 2nd May to Friday 8th July
  • T3: Monday 25th July to Friday 30th September
  • T4: Monday 17th October to Friday 16th December

Named in honour of Queen Adelaide, Adelaide was founded in 1836 as the planned capital for the oly free-settled British province in Australia. Designed in a grid layout known as the “Light Vision” and located close to the River Torrens, Colonel William Light is identified as one of the founding fathers and the key designer of the city. As the only freely-settled city in Australia at the time, it was shaped by the diversity and wealth of the free settlers.

TAS

  • T1: Wednesday 9th February to Wednesday 13th April 
  • T2: Monday 2nd May to Friday 8th July
  • T3: Tuesday 26th July to Friday 30th September
  • T4: Monday 17th October to Wednesday 21st December

Originally called Hobart Town or Hobarton, Australia’s second oldest city adopted the name Hobart in 1881 from the Forth Early of Buckinghamshire who was also known as Lord Hobart.  Settled as a British penal colony and defensive outpost in 1803 it was originally located at Risdon Cove on the eastern shores of the Derwent River, however, it was moved in 1804 to its current location at Sullivans Cove. 

VIC

  • T1:Monday 31st January to Friday 8th April
  • T2: Tuesday 26th April to Friday 24th June
  • T3: Monday 11th July to Friday 16th September
  • T4: Monday 3rd October to Tuesday 20th December

Part of the original British Colony and a short-lived penal settlement at Port Phillip, Melbourne was officially settled in 1835 with the arrival of free settlers from van Diemens Land (Tasmania) and identified as the crown settlement of Melbourne in 1837. Named for the then British Prime Minister, William Lamb, the 2nd Viscount Melbourne, it served as the interim capital of Australia after the 1901 federation until Canberra became the permanent capital in 1927.

WA

  • T1: Monday 31st January to Friday 8th April
  • T2: Tuesday 26th April to Friday 1st July
  • T3: Monday 18th July to Friday 23rd September
  • T4: Monday 10th October to Thursday 15th December

Origianlly sighted and documented by Dutch Captain Willem de Vlamingh on January 10th 1697, it was eventually settled by the British Captain James Stirling in 1829 as the centre of the Swan River Colony. Perth takes its name from the city of Perth in Scotland, influenced by Stirling’s patron Sir George Murray who had connections with the area. Gaining status as a city in 1856, the population increased significantly due to the gold rush in the late 1800’s.